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wmfd.com - The hardships Greek people have faced are fueling the explosion of tensions we've seen here in Athens. On Sunday, the people will get their say and vote on whether to agree to new reforms with the country's creditors.

   
 
 
Hardships Greek People Have Endured Could Change With Vote

Story By: Larry Stine

 

 

 
 
 
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  The hardships Greek people have faced are fueling the explosion of tensions we've seen here in Athens.
  On Sunday, the people will get their say and vote on whether to agree to new reforms with the country's creditors.
  CNN's Isa Soares has more on how the coming referendum is playing out on the streets of Athens.
  From high above, the battle lines are hard to make out.
  But walk the streets of Athens and the ruptures are easy to spot.
  This is a city and a nation deeply divided, both politically and ideologically.
  In the affluent district of Athens, where coffees are sipped endlessly, and where money speaks volumes, locals tell me they've never been this nervous.
  I meet lawyer Elena in the local square.
  She tells me her concerns have grown in the last few days following the growing support of the "no" camp.
   "Most of them they are for Europe, they want to say yes in the referendum; however, any young people believe they don't have anything to lose so with this vote they might vote for no," Elena says.
  It's this very thought that has many on edge.
  With a rising number concerned that the rest of the country doesn't quite understand the risk that a no vote would bring,
  "Hopefully, next Sunday, we will vote yes because we want to remain in the European Union that's where we belong," says one Greek resident.
  "What I've noticed is that Athenians are not speaking in one voice," says CNN's Isa Soares. "So, we are driving just two kilometers away from this affluent area in Athens to Kessariani to hear from those who are defiantly pushing for a 'no' vote."
  Here, in this populist neighborhood, the "Oxi" "No" campaign is in full swing, with posters placed strategically in every corner.
  Anna tells me "we in this historical area of Kessariani, we are fighting to get our lives and dignity back so we are finding hope in the fact that the public will make their mark on Sunday."
  This defiance is palpable and understandable.
  This is, after all, a symbolic neighborhood of the left.
  Alexis Tsipras made this his first stop when he was elected and it seems his rhetoric has shaped this part of Athens.
  Angelos tells me the best for him and for his country would be to leave the Eurozone for good.
  "Because we have seen the side of the solidarity inside the Eurozone and it's non-existent," he says, fighting talk from a deeply divided country.
  One that now stands on the edge of an economic precipice.

   
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